How to detect, enable and disable SMBv1, SMBv2, and SMBv3 in Windows

This article describes how to enable and disable Server Message Block (SMB) version 1 (SMBv1), SMB version 2 (SMBv2), and SMB version 3 (SMBv3) on the SMB client and server components.

Disabled SMBv1 server and client via Group Policy is the best option!

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/storage/file-server/troubleshoot/detect-enable-and-disable-smbv1-v2-v3

Top 25 Active Directory Security Best Practices

A comprehensive list of the top 25 Active Directory Security Tips and best practices. Securing domain admins, local administrators, audit policies, monitoring AD for compromise, password policies, vulnerability scanning and more.

See https://activedirectorypro.com/active-directory-security-best-practices/

Here are the 25 that he lists:
  1. Clean up the Domain Admins Group
  2. Use at Least Two Accounts (Regular and Admin Account)
  3. Secure The Domain Administrator account
  4. Disable the Local Administrator Account (on all computers)
  5. Use Local Administrator Password Solution (LAPS)
  6. Use a Secure Admin Workstation (SAW)
  7. Enable Audit policy Settings with Group Policy
  8. Monitor Active Directory Events for Signs of Compromise
  9. Password Complexity Sucks (Use Passphrases Instead)
  10. Use Descriptive Security Group Names
  11. Cleanup Old Active Directory User & Computer Accounts
  12. Do NOT Install Additional Software or Roles on Domain Controllers
  13. Continues Patch Management & Vulnerability Scanning
  14. Use DNS Services to Block Malicious Domains
  15. Run Critical Infrastructure on latest Windows Operating System
  16. Use Two Factor Authentication for Remote Access
  17. Monitor DHCP Logs for Connected Devices
  18. Monitor DNS Logs for Security Threats
  19. Use Latest ADFS and Azure Security Features
  20. Use Office 365 Secure Score
  21. Plan for Compromise ( Have a recovery plan)
  22. Document Delegation to Active Directory
  23. Lock Down Service Accounts
  24. Disable SMBv1
  25. Use Security Baselines and Benchmarks

bandwhich

bandwhich sniffs a given network interface and records IP packet size, cross referencing it with the /proc filesystem on linux or lsof on macOS. It is responsive to the terminal window size, displaying less info if there is no room for it. It will also attempt to resolve ips to their host name in the background using reverse DNS on a best effort basis.

More info and install details: https://github.com/imsnif/bandwhich

How to use AWS Secrets Manager to securely store and rotate SSH key pairs

This AWS Article will show you how to secure, rotate, and use SSH keypairs for inter-cluster communication. You’ll use an AWS CloudFormation template to launch a cluster and configure Secrets Manager. Then we’ll show you how to use Secrets Manager to deliver the keypair to the cluster and use it for management operations, such as securely copying a file between nodes. Finally, we’ll use Secrets Manager to seamlessly rotate the keypair used by the cluster without any changes or outages. In this post, we’ve highlighted compute clusters, but you can use Secrets Manager to apply this solution directly to any SSH based use-case.

More info and to launch the CF Stack:

https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/how-to-use-aws-secrets-manager-securely-store-rotate-ssh-key-pairs/

mkcert – local certs

mkcert is a simple tool for making locally-trusted development certificates. It requires no configuration. Perfect for local test systems and local internal servers only!

https://github.com/FiloSottile/mkcert

Installation:
https://github.com/FiloSottile/mkcert#installation

First Create CA:
mkcert -install

Create cert for example:
mkcert example.com "*.example.com" example.test localhost 127.0.0.1 ::1